How to make a Star Wars TIE Advanced grill

How to build a spacecraft shaped BBQ grill | Crafty Enigneer

Great stuff from Interesting Engineering:

Do you need a unique and interesting BBQ-come-fire-pit for your garden? Then this fantastic build is something you really need to see. 

But wait, there is more. This particular burner/BBQ just happens to also be in the shape of Darth Vader’s Tie Advanced from Star Wars! What is not to love?

This would go well with a Star Wars stormtrooper decanter filled with a beverage of your choice.

How to make concrete in a microwave

You might have heard about the tool who cemented his head into a microwave. The emergency services in Wolverhampton wasted an hour getting the man’s head out. As pranks go, it was an idiotic one and we won’t say anything more than that. But it got me to thinking – could you actually make cement in a microwave? After a YouTube search, I found a how-to guide for making concrete in a microwave but not the classic grey stuff.

The video below demonstrates how to make concrete in a microwave using sand cornstarch and water. Enjoy (and don’t be a fool when you do it)!

How to make concrete at home - CoRncrete TU Delft (TfCD)

How to make a smashburger (by J. Kenji López-Alt)

The late night smashburger

I’ve given way too much money to Five Guys this year. I tried my hand at making one and, while it wasn’t the same, it was tasty nonetheless. The basic premise is the same for most modern burger outlets:

  • 2 flattened beef patties
  • Cheese slices in between
  • An assortment of fillings (my faves are pickles, ketchup, and mustard)

American chef J. Kenji López-Alt made a video in March demonstrating his way of making a “late night smashed cheeseburger” in the style of a smashburger, as popularised by the fast food chain Smashburger.

My mouth watered throughout the video so stream it below and let us know what you’d have in your smashburger.

Late Night Smashed Cheeseburger

Beef related: Burger King’s rebrand and Salt Bae: the king of steaks.

How to brew Chinese tea correctly

How to brew Chinese tea right

Forget everything you know about brewing Chinese tea as Goldthread has the inside scoop.

In their video, they look at the “right” way to brew Chinese tea, including the ceremonial process known as gongfu cha:

Gongfu means skill, and cha means tea. It’s a form of Chinese tea service that dates back to the 14th century in Fujian. It places emphasis on the tea’s taste, temperature, and quality.

The ceremony of gongfu cha is a far cry from the American TikToker who made tea in a microwave with a truckload of sugar and milk. If there was a spectrum of tea making, China and the US would be on either side.

Stream the video below.

How to Brew Chinese Tea the Right Way

Tea related: Is tea the new wine?

How to make MooMoo Milk from Pokémon

MooMoo milk

Miltank remains my most hated Pokémon. Fans of the game will know exactly why and which Miltank I mean—Whitney’s Miltank. But the one thing it has going for it is MooMoo Milk.

In-game, MooMoo Milk restores a Pokémon by 100 HP but IRL, it’s not officially a thing so there are a plethora of recipes for it. I settled for this recipe and bottle tutorial (because MooMoo Milk is a brand in the Pokémon world).

MooMoo Milk recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 cup of milk
  • 1/2 tablespoon of agave (1 tablespoon if you want it sweeter) or 1 tablespoon of sugar
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract

Instructions

  • Mix together serve

If you don’t want to make the bottle, you can skip to 9:08 for the milk recipe. It might not help you defeat Whitney’s Miltank but it’ll be damn tasty. Now I’m wondering how MooMoo Cheese would taste so I can add it to the growing Cultrface cheese collection.

EASY Pokemon MooMoo Milk Bottle DIY + Recipe (collab with iloveanimewebshow)

How to make a Taiwanese Castella

Taiwanese Castella Cake Recipe | Emojoie

Emojoie Cuisine uploaded a video of its Taiwanese Castella recipe and my mouth is watering as I write this. I love sponge cakes but this looks especially decadent.

The cake was introduced by Portuguese travellers as “a bread from Castile” which the Japanese later turned into Castella. Nagasaki is now regarded as the birthplace of Castella and the cake was introduced to Taiwan when Japan ruled it. Bakeries refined the recipe and in 1975, Castella varieties included local foods including Taiwanese Longan honey and Japanese cheese.

Stream the video below and turn on subtitles for the recipe (available in Swedish, Russian, European Portuguese, Bangla, Korean, Persian, German, Turkish, Italian, Greek, and Arabic).

Jean-Michel Basquiat's ideas of how to be an artist

Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat Holding Engagement Ring

I’ve never been interviewed for media. But if I was, I’d probably be like Jean-Michel Basquiat. His curt response to the few he participated in were typical of an artist who preferred paint to parle.

But in his verbal expressions were ideals of how to be an artist and that’s what Alexxa Gotthardt gleaned in an Artsy editorial about Basquiat published earlier this month.

Basquiat’s “Flats Fix” from 1981 was the re-imagining of Autobody shops signs in Brooklyn. Of that, his father said:

“It is one of the things he remembered well and extracted multiple meanings from. He always used simple symbolism to explain complex situations.” In this case, it was the culture of his native Brooklyn and his identity as a black man within it.

So much of Basquiat’s work focussed on black identity. The way he burst onto the high brow scene literally from the streets was remarkable in its own way. Many black artists have tried to follow suit but never retained the same level of black integrity that Basquiat did, until his untimely death in 1988.

My favourite piece of advice from the editorial has to be “remix your references”. That’s my primary ethos whenever I create. When asked about a method of working, Basquiat said:

“I’m usually in front of the television. I have to have some source material around me to work off.”

He liked to immerse himself in multimedia while he created it. For others, this would have been the ultimate distraction. For Basquiat, it was essential.

Jean Michel Basquiat 1985 interview

Madison Moore Gives Lectures on "How to be Beyoncé"

It’s not going to happen but her influence in pop culture is strong enough to warrant emulation. This admiration hasn’t gone unnoticed, however, as Madison Moore, a postdoctoral research associate from King’s College London, has started a public seminar entitled “How to be Beyoncé”. Moore gives tips on how to replicate Beyoncé’s success and delves into her stance within pop culture alongside Moore’s own research.

“I’m all about taking popular culture seriously,” he said. “I believe you can take any pop cultural text and open it up and see what’s happening on the inside.”

Beyoncé related: An essay on why Jaap Kooijman writes about Beyoncé

(via The Telegraph)