Los Angeles' new tourism logo looks super cool

Apparently, locals are divided over the new logo but I like it and Rob Beschizza made a good point about its implied “specific synth baseline”.

The logo was designed by House Industries and Studio Number One, which was founded by artist Shepard Fairey.

“When you say ‘Los Angeles’ it doesn’t necessarily mean just a city,” Fairey said. “It’s a whole mindset, a vibe, a culture. And as an Angeleno, it was exciting to me to take on the creative challenge of designing a mark representing all the things that Los Angeles means to people.”

Quote from CBS

Very 80s, much synthwave, wow!

(via Boing Boing)

Where did Ruff & Mews go from Petco's new logo?

petco logos

Erastus Kingbolt wrote about Petco’s latest logo dissolution in his Systems Theory newsletter. Where once Ruff and Mews once sat, now we are left with a generic blue wordmark:

Cold and lifeless is a fair description, isn’t it? There are absolutely no friendly animals, the font is somehow even more sterile than it was beforeand in place of the already watered-down red there is the inanimate blue of Marshalls and USPS. The jokes about the health and wellness part write themselves, but I will say that even the CEO doesn’t seem to think that it’s true. “We’re transitioning from being a company that asks, ‘Can I help you put that big bag of dog food into your cart?’ into a full health and wellness company,” he told Fortune. “Today, Petco is the ONLY complete health and wellness company for pets,” he wrote in the opening letter of the IPO filing. A few more times and he’ll be convinced.

I love a wordmark logo but not as a progression from something that already works. Petco’s original logo with its jellied red text and happy-go-lucky pets was playful, fun, and engaging (you rarely see a cat and dog so chummy together). But now it’s just like any other logo. Before you knew Petco was for pets before you even saw the word—great for non-English speakers—but now you assume it’s for pets, despite the vague tagline underneath.

People showed disdain but I don’t see the new branding causing significant damage to Petco. It’s just a shame that another brand has fallen foul of the dreaded Minimalist Logo Syndrome.

Pet related: when pets wore masks during the 1918 flu pandemic

Opinions on the Biden-Harris logo

biden-harris logo

Not long after presidential candidate Joe Biden chose Kamala Harris as his running mate, they revealed their joint logo. Lilly Smith, writing for Fast Company, asked 10 experts what they thought of the design including:

The general consensus? The font looks great, the logo is generally good but it might not matter that much. Even the criticisms were rounded off with “whatever, I’d still vote for Biden because he’s not Trump“. Top expert opinions. But what was I expecting? When I look at it, I’m neither repulsed nor enthused. It’s Just Another Sans-Serif Logotype.

From Debbie Millman:

“I never, ever thought I’d say this after a lifetime in professional branding, but on the spectrum of good branding versus effective branding, I’d say at this point it is irrelevant. Frankly, the Biden-Harris logo could have been scribbled on a napkin and I’d be happy.”

And Sagi Haviv:

“Let’s be honest: it’s not a good logo. Why does the E deserve to be the highlight of the identity? How about emphasizing the B as his first initial? And turning an E into three lines is something we’ve seen.

For such a consequential election—and now an (sic) historic candidacy—I could see them taking a fresh look at Biden’s somewhat amateurish logo from the primary and maybe doing something more dynamic and innovative. (Harris’s logo for her own primary run was much more original and carried a message.) However, perhaps this bulky, uninspiring mark reflects exactly this ticket’s promise: a safe, predictable return to normalcy. I’ll vote for them.”

Safe, predictable return to normalcy? That’s a loaded statement if I ever heard one.

Pentagram refresh Fisher-Price's logo and it's lovely

Fisher-Price logo

I loved my Fisher-Price tape recorder. They don’t make them like that anymore (mainly because kids don’t use cassettes in 2020). Even though I recorded some of my finest voice work in the 90s, the logo was quintessentially retro.

Well, Pentagram did what they do best and freshened things up. The result is really good, in my opinion.

The new branding by Pentagram refines the visual identity and expands it to a customized kit of parts that gives Fisher-Price the flexibility to function consistently in a variety of environments. The exuberant use of colorful graphics and unconventional typography captures the brand attributes of fun, action, play, celebration, silliness and joy.

Pentagram

As you can see from the logos below, the changes are very subtle. The new “f” is lower case and fused with the “i” to make a ligature. The “p” is lower case too but the “h” remains intact from the original.

The cosmetic changes are small on their own but grouped together, along with the new “FP” wordmark, it’s a brilliant brand refresh.