Panteha Abareshi on Ableism in the Art World

Filling the Void: Confronting Ableism in the Art Space

Ableism is a serious issue in all aspects of life and in Panteha Abareshi’s Filling the Void: Confronting Ableism in the Art Space, she will examine it within the art world.

In an email to Hyperallergic, she discussed the reality of accessibility and ableism within the industry:

“We are currently unable to realistically conceive of real, integrated accessibility, because of how deeply ableism permeates. I will be focusing not on giving cut-and-dry solutions to inaccessibility, but rather delving deeply into ableism as something we are all compliant within, and my personal experience as an ill/disabled body navigating an ableist world.”

Over two sessions (22nd-23rd August), Abareshi will “confront the complex systems of ableism that operate within the art space with presentations and an open forum via Google Meet. On 23rd, she will introduce work by disabled artists alongside her Abareshi’s own to answer the question: “how are able-bodied artists and the art world perpetuating an erasure of artists and audiences with disabilities?”

To find out how to join the sessions, head to the Institute of Contemporary Art website for more info.

Alternatives to ableist terms

(Content warning: this article contains ableist slurs for the purposes of definitions)

We all know how language can evolve beyond our control. The word ‘literally’ can now mean the opposite, for example. But there are words that we use that have negative connotations.

The word ‘crazy’ used to mean ‘to be sickly and infirm’ back in the 1500’s but its meaning changed to ‘insane’ or demented’ a century later. In the 20th and 21st century, it became a colloquial term to describe something that was ‘unexpected’. But that change in use doesn’t make it okay in non-derogatory ways.

What is ableism?

Ableism is a form of discrimination against disabled people or those perceived to have disabilities. An example of ableism could be:

  • Calling someone ‘mental’ for leaving their door unlocked
  • Building difficult-to-read fonts
  • Creating a movie without audio descriptions or closed captions

Using ableist terms is a common form of ableism because of our dependence on media and conversation. Words like ‘crazy’, ‘stupid’, or ‘mental’ are still weaponised against people with mental illnesses and reinforce centuries of stigma.

Given the English language’s penchant for stolen—sorry, ‘loan’ words—there are plenty you can use in replacement of these terms. Here are some alternatives.

Note: context is key so some alternatives might not make sense for the same words. That’s for you to decide. These lists are also:

  1. Non-exhaustive
  2. Imperfect

So if I’ve included a term that is considered ableist and you have a better alternative, let me know in the comments and I’ll remove it. Nobody is above reproach regarding ableism and it’s all about doing better by people.

Alternatives to crazy/mental/nuts

  • wild
  • unreal
  • incredible
  • bizarre
  • ridiculous
  • absurd
  • comical
  • farcical
  • silly
  • ludicrous
  • foolish
  • nonsensical
  • outrageous
  • shocking
  • astonishing
  • unbelievable
  • unthinkable

Alternatives to stupid

  • asinine
  • banal
  • clueless
  • fatuous
  • foolish
  • frivolous
  • gullible
  • ignorant
  • inept
  • insipid
  • irrational
  • misguided
  • misinformed
  • mistaken
  • naïve
  • oblivious
  • obtuse
  • uninformed
  • unwise
  • vacuous
  • vapid
  • wrong

Alternatives to idiot/moron/cretin

  • fool
  • asshole/arsehole
  • chump
  • jackass
  • jerk
  • melt
  • silly-billy
  • wally
  • git
  • muppet
  • tit
  • turkey
  • goofball
  • goof

Further reading