Game of Thrones books versus the TV series

Game of Thrones books versus the TV series

After a hiatus, I’m back into Game of Thrones for the last ever series. I never read the books but I don’t think I will as my Goodreads list is way too big.

The above image shows how much of the books were dramatised per series. As the books went on, the number of POVs (points of view) decreased to a mere 17.5 in Series 7. It comes from a deeper analysis of the books vs. the television series, created by Alyssa Karla Mungcal, Jocelyn Tan, and Pooja Sharma. And for anyone wondering why there might be such differences:

There are various reasons why the screen version would differ from the book, one of which is the limited screen time, but the most important reason is the budget. Every actor costs money, and more if they are speaking roles, so sometimes a minor character’s action is given to an existing character. The direwolves are shown more in the books, but they cost money to animate, less is spent on the dragons.

Sounds fair to me.

(via Flowing Data and got-books-to-series.surge.sh)

Copyrighted works from 1923 enter the public domain today

Public Domain

Firstly, happy new year to you all. We hope 2019 is even more prosperous than 2018. If you’re a creative or a lover of the arts, today’s events might help with that.

1st January is Public Domain Day. What does that mean? Well, works of art from 1923 become the copyright-free to the public, meaning you can quote as much as you want wherever you want without attribution. The same will be said for works from 1924 next year, 1925 the year after and so on. Naturally, works before 1923 are also public domain unless otherwise set.

This was meant to take place a lot sooner if it wasn’t for an intervention by the US government. In 1998, congress signed a bill, sponsored by Sonny Bono (yes, that Sonny Bono) allowing a 20-year extension of the copyright term. According to Open Culture, “the legislation, aimed at protecting Mickey Mouse, created a ‘bizarre 20-year hiatus between the release of works from 1922 and 1923.'” Now that’s over, certain Mickey Mouse cartoons and appearances are free to remix without fear of Disney. Well, fear of Disney is never totally extinguished.

But what was released in 1923? A lot of stuff. Mostly silent movies, artwork from the Art Deco period, works from the Harlem Renaissance, early jazz compositions. If you love modernism as I do, this will be like uncovering a treasure trove.

Below you will find a list of works from 1923 and general content free from copyrights. Always remember to check works from any years prior to 1923 to make absolutely sure you follow any licence requirements (if there are any). And happy hunting!

Lists of public domain works from 1923 and more

Airport Novella - A Comedic Book by Tom Comitta

airport novella

Walking through departures feels like taking steps through a wardrobe into Narnia. You can buy things tax-free and as far as you’re concerned, you’re already on holiday the moment you’re at the gate. At the overpriced newsagents, they sell cheap holiday books. A few hundred pages of drivel containing gaping plot holes, excessive use of adjectives, and poorly constructed characters. But people buy them anyway because who needs a difficult read for a week on a sunny beach? These ideas formed the basis of Tom Comitta’s Airport Novella.

The 48-page book contains four chapters, each one dedicated to a particular gesture: “nodding, shrugging, odd looks, and gasps”. What does that entail? Download a free copy or purchase one to find out (but physical copies are shipped to the US only).

Seitō - a 1911 Japanese magazine exclusively for women

seito-cover

A publication for women, particularly women of colour, is something I can get behind and Seitō is one such magazine.

Initially created as a collection of work “for women and by women”, Seitō (the Japanese word for “Bluestocking”) started in 1911 slowly became a feminist movement. The five women who created the magazine, known as the Japanese Bluestocking Society, or Seitō-sha, were:

The Japanese government moved to ban its publication but this only spurred the writers to continue. Feminist Hideko Fukuda wrote this for “The Solution to the Woman Question”:

“Only under such circumstances will real women’s liberation come about,” […] “Unless this first step is taken, even if women get voting rights, and even if courts, universities, and government offices in general are opened to women, those who enter these, will, of course, only be women from the influential class; the majority of ordinary women will necessarily be excluded from these circles. Thus, just as class warfare breaks out among men, so class warfare will occur among women.”

Seitō was a pioneering publication for Japenese women and went onto produce 52 issues and feature over 100 contributors before it folded in 1916.

Further reading

Codex Seraphinianus is one weird-ass book

Codex Seraphinianus

There are plenty of weird and indecipherable texts in history. But one of the most curious texts in recent times is the Codex Seraphinianus. Published in 1981, the codex was written by Italian artist, architect and industrial designer Luigi Serafini over a two-year period between 1976 and 1978.

But what’s inside the Codex Seraphinianus?

To put it crudely, it’s a made-up encyclopedia. Codex Seraphinianus depicts an imaginary world with a cypher and a host of different topics including nature, clothing, and architecture. The illustrations in the book were surreal to say the least. They included:

  • A weird horse-carriage fusion
  • Bleeding fruit
  • Chair-shaped plants
  • A couple that transforms into an alligator

The point of the codex is to stretch the realms of the imagination but it’s incomprehensible. The cypher is but none of the text has any meaning. And that was the point.

At the end of the day [it’s] similar to the Rorschach inkblot test. You see what you want to see. You might think it’s speaking to you, but it’s just your imagination.

Luigi Serafini, author and illustrator of the Codex Seraphinianus

Where can you buy a copy?

It was originally published in Italy but it made it to a few other countries. The original edition is still super rare but a newer edition came out in 2013, selling out its 3,000 pre-ordered copies.

You can buy a copy of Codex Seraphinianus from Amazon. A hard copy is about £75 if you have deep pockets for surrealism.

Picturing Prince: An Intimate Portrait

picturing-prince

Prince was quite a secretive person but you won’t be short of photographs of him. Picturing Prince: An Intimate Portrait will piece together never-before-seen photos of the late musician, taken by Steve Parke.

A new book from Cassell, Picturing Prince: An Intimate Portrait, out September 5, aims to add depth to Prince’s public persona; it features never-before-seen photographs by Steve Parke, the musician’s former art director at Paisley Park, including 16 pages of lost photographs from his extensive archive.

Along with those images are some hilarious anecdotes from Parke, revealing more about Prince than most fans would know. Stories include The Purple One renting out whole movie theatres at 4am, requests for exotic animals, and his love of basketball. Away from taking photos of Prince, Steve Parke also designed his album covers and merch before becoming the official Paisley Park art director. That’s a high accolade given Prince’s attention to detail and perfectionism when it came to his image.

This is a must-read for Prince fans and music lovers alike.

View a slideshow of nine photos via The Cut.

Pussy and Her Language - A Pamphlet For Cats

Ever heard of Marvin R. Clark? Probably not. But in 1895, he self-published “Pussy and Her Language”, a publication teaching cat owners how to treat their feline friends. He was a cat lover himself and his intention with the pamphlet was to give “one out of a million Cats” a good name. Here are some quotes from the 150-page book:

“I have already given seventeen of the most important words of the feline language, with their English equivalents, as follows:

Aelio – Food.
Lae – Milk.
Parriere – Open.
Aliloo – Water.
Bl – Meat.
Ptlee-bl – Mouse meat.
Bleeme-bl – Cooked meat.
Pad – Foot.
Leo – Head.
Pro – Nail or claw.
Tut – Limb.
Papoo – Body.
Oolie – Fur.
Mi-ouw – Beware.
Purrieu – Satisfaction or content.
Yow – Extermination.
Mieouw – Here.”

“According to the primal order of speech and the manner of the construction of sentences in the Cat language, you will hear such utterances as these: ‘Milk give me,’ ‘Meat I want,’ ‘Mary I love,’ ‘Going out, my mistress?’ ‘Sick I am,’ ‘Happy are my babies,'”

“Your Noah Webster, who padded your dictionary in order to make a formidable book, like many another man, says that animals are not possessed of reasoning powers, but have only instinct. […] This is your American authority, and you must accept it, for you have adopted the dictionary. By this definition, and with only one question, I will prove to you that animals have reasoning powers, just as men have.”

(via Atlas Obscura)

Hibaq Osman - The Heart Is A Smashed Bulb

Hibaq Osman - The Heart Is A Smashed Bulb

Hibaq Osman is a Somali writer born and based in London. Her work centres women, identity and the healing process. I’ve been following Hibaq online for a number of years and it’s been wonderful watching her grow as a poet. Her words cut and soothe in equal measure.

The thing about blood
it reeks of metal
baby,
aren’t you sick of chains?

What a verse. Just wow.

The Heart Is A Smashed Bulb is a four-part anthology and you can download it via Google Drive. I also recommend you buy A Silence You Can Carry and Where The Memory Was as well.

Brutal bookends

Landmarks Bookend (Set of 2) by Klemens Schillinger

The brutalist bookends are a concrete take on the Mayan pyramids (although they’re very close to being ziggurats).

An architectural twist on functional accessories, reimagined in stylish concrete. Subtle in colour but crisp in form, Klemens Schillinger’s Landmarks collection evokes a certain understated cool. Perfect for those who want dimensions to rule style: each step is an extruded offset of the footprint that comes before it.

I have two books on brutalism on my bookshelf and these bookends would be perfect for them. I’ll give it some thought.

UPDATE: The bookends are no longer available on Hem.com but there are plenty of alternatives on Etsy.